Robin V. Wish - Real Living Suburban Lifestyle Real Estate



Posted by Robin V. Wish on 9/2/2019

Once meant only for elegant Victorian boudoirs, the slipper chair has come to its own as a design element for side chairs, cozy reading areas, even as a more stylish desk chair. So just what is a slipper chair?

Historic versus modern

In 18th-century European homes, the wide, low, armless chairs graced the rooms of ladies wearing heavy layers of petticoats, tightly laced corsets, and other constricting clothing. For a handmaid to reach their lady’s feet to put on a shoe or slipper became nearly impossible. So, the invention of the slipper chair was one of necessity, allowing ladies’ maids to help them don footwear.

In the 20th century, American designer Billy Baldwin brought the chair from the bedroom to the living room and now, variations on this iconic style appear in designs from the bedroom to the boardroom. Different from elaborately carved legs and tufted back, the modern versions are simple, unadorned pieces that play well with other furniture or work on their own to fill a quiet nook.

These days, slipper chairs come in all designs from tufted and buttoned to gusseted with bright piping to elaborately embroidered peplums. And, with a more masculine take on the modern look, some come with massive wooden platform bases or sleek metal legs.

Popular Versions

  • Turned and tufted: A throwback to the Victorian era, the tufted chair has extra padding and curved legs. More decorative than some, this chair fits well in a bedroom or reading nook.
  • Skirting the issue: Pleated skirts give a casual look to this low chair with box pleats being most common.
  • Tilted and low: An even squattier version of the slipper chair's already low profile, this chair leans toward the back slightly, offering up built-in relaxation. This adorable chair trimmed with piping, legs upholstered, fits in any room but is perfect for lazy days of book reading or enjoying a glass of wine.
  • Bold and buff: Chrome, wood, Lucite and other Mid-Century Modern elements bring these chairs into the office or study.
  • Casual and laid-back: The addition of rattan bases and indoor/outdoor fabric make island-inspired versions perfect for a sunroom or outdoor living area.

Whatever your version of the slipper chair, know its design is for modern living. Pair it with a comfy sofa or line up three sleek current versions instead of a couch for flexible seating. And if you have the ideal slipper chair but don't have the perfect place for it, maybe it's time that you find a new place, so check with your real estate professional to see that perfect home for your perfect chair.




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Posted by Robin V. Wish on 3/25/2019

When you buy a new sofa or chair, it’s a big investment. You want to know that whatever kind of fabric that you choose will be a good color and texture for a long time to come. When you’re shopping for upholstery, the most important thing is practicality. You may not want to buy a leather sofa with a toddler running around, for example. Any kind of fabric that could get dirty easily, or rip and stain, may not be the best choice when you have kids around the house. There are plenty of durable fabrics available.  


You also need to worry about any pets that you have in the home. Cats and dogs tend to scratch things, rip them, or relieve themselves where they aren’t supposed to. This can cause beautiful, expensive furniture to be ruined in minutes. You’ll want to choose something that is easy to clean the pet hair off of and even easier to clean. 


Choose A Durable Fabric


Even if you don’t have kids, since the majority of people don’t live in a bubble, you’ll want to choose a fabric that is both comfortable and versatile. Adults spill things too! Don’t forget that slipcovers are always an option as well.  This allows you to change your fabric anytime that you wish easily and inexpensively.


If You’re Free Flaunt It


If pets and kids aren’t aren’t a worry for you, you should flaunt your freedom! You can go a bit more elaborate in your choice of fabric and materials. You won’t need the same types of fabrics and colors that a household with kids would need if you’re on your own. Go for that white sofa and own it! 


Consider How The Material Will Age


When shopping for furniture, ask a lot of questions about the lifetime outlook for certain fabrics. You’ll also want to understand how difficult maintaining certain types of fabrics will be. Leather, for example, is a bit more high maintenance than other types of fabric. If the sofa will be near windows, the sun can easily wear through the color of a material. You should have all of these things in mind while you’re shopping for the perfect sofa or chair. 


Take A Look At Everything In Person


While online shopping can be great for many things, you probably don’t want to choose your fabrics for furniture solely based on an internet search. You should be able to see and feel the material to help you decide how it will fit into your home. It’s also important to know how sitting on a certain material feels to you. A material may look nice in a picture, but may not work at all for your needs when you see it in person. Ask for advice from the associates at the furniture store as well. They can help you to find the right material to suit your needs and wants.




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Posted by Robin V. Wish on 6/11/2018

Finding out the quality of furniture at a furniture store can be difficult. Product descriptions are written with the goal of getting you to buy. What’s more, floor sales employees will boast about the quality of their “genuine bonded leather,” how easy it is to clean and how long it lasts.

What many people don’t know is that words like “genuine” don’t mean “real” leather, but rather a grade of leather. Genuine leather is, in fact, the second worst type of leather in terms of quality and durability.

To help you avoid this and other blunders at the furniture store, we’ve written a simple guide to furniture leather that aid you in making the most informed decision possible the next time you’re at the furniture store. After all, furniture is expensive, and you want to make sure you get the best option for you and your family.

Leather grades

Bonded. The most basic thing to understand about leather are the grades. At the bottom of the list, or the lowest grade leather, is bonded leather. The word “leather” is actually generous in this scenario because bonded leather is really made up of fragments of leftover leather that have been glued together (or “bonded”) with latex or poly.

Bonded leather is often used for furniture because large items like sofas require so much of it. Manufacturers won’t soon tell you just how much of the sofa is comprised of leather and how much of it is composed of latex, so be wary of spending a lot of money on bonded leather furniture.

Genuine. Genuine leather, also known as “corrected grain” leather has artificial grain applied to its surface. This top grain is designed to increase the visual appeal of the leather by changing the texture and pigmentation to create different colors.

While genuine leather is a step above bonded leather, it is also subject to wear as the surface isn’t true leather.

Suede. Suede is a type of “split grain” leather, meaning that the top of the piece of leather has been removed and sanded forming the soft, suede texture and color we are all familiar with.

Top and full grain. The highest quality leathers are top and full grain. Top grain has had the split removed which makes it both easier to work with as well as softer and more flexible. Full grain, on the other hand has not had the split removed and is often unbuffed and unsanded. It isn’t as common to see this type of leather used in furniture because the imperfections are often removed in favor of a more visually congruent leather. However, since full grain hasn’t had any layers removed, it is easily the most durable type of leather.

Shopping tips

Now that you know more about the types of leather, here are some tips for when you hit the furniture store.

  • Each manufacturer may use their own numbering system for grading leather, so don’t count on them being accurate.

  • Treated leather, in spite of seeming lower quality, may be more resistant to stains and thus preferable for a family with kids and pets.

  • Leather furniture that has received minimum treatment and includes the top grain requires specific cleaning. Don’t attempt to condition the leather with oils like you might a leather shoe that has been subject to the elements. Rather, use warm, damp, soft cloth to wipe down the leather every month or so. Soaps and cleaning solutions can do more harm than good to quality leather.




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