Robin V. Wish - Real Living Suburban Lifestyle Real Estate



Posted by Robin V. Wish on 6/24/2019

If you live in an older home that needs a face-lift, you might be tempted just to paint it white or one of the many neutral colors you see around you. But sometimes neutrals just fade into the background. So, if you want your home to stand out, consider being bold and expressive with your exterior.

As you drive through older neighborhoods, make a note of the colors you love and the combinations that stand out to you. Depending on the exterior materials—stucco, brick, block, rock, vinyl, wood siding, shakes, etc. - and the architectural details you want to highlight, you can locate samples that “speak to you” and express your home’s personality.

Beware the covenants

If you live in an association operated development, check your covenants before hiring that paint crew. Some associations require submission of color choices and alternatives to an architectural or aesthetic committee for approval. Others have pre-selected color schemes from which to choose. In those cases, your options are more limited than if you can freely decide for yourself. So, select a combination that differs from your nearest neighbors and from other houses with your same facade. Opt for colorful shutters and doors instead to give your home some extra visibility.

Be brave, not obnoxious

On the other hand, if you have available any choice in the world, choose combinations that reflect the region, enhance the neighborhood, and reveal your home’s unique features. In many cases, subtlety adds more value to your home than a glaring hue. But if you’re showcasing a Mid-Century or ultra-modern home, go ahead and shout it out!

If you’re not sure what works for you, take a trip to your local specialty paint store. There, an in-house designer can show you combinations of color and materials, finishes and sheen. You’ll learn what colors can fade in bright sunshine or dull with the weather, and which paints will hold up to your local environmental conditions.

Also, take note of the preparation required to give your new exterior a long, full life. You may need to clean and power wash brick, repair cracked or broken stucco, and scrape peeling paint from wood siding and window trim.

While fiber-cement-based siding often accepts paint, vinyl likely does not, or it only accepts specific paint applications with an adhesive primer and quality, acrylic paint. Do not attempt to paint vinyl siding yourself without practicing the techniques on a hidden area first. If your home has vinyl siding, you may want to change the siding to change the color instead. Check the pricing both ways to see which is more economical for your home.

If you’re painting your home to sell it, get the opinion of your real estate professional for colors that attract buyers in your area.





Posted by Robin V. Wish on 3/20/2017

Vinyl siding can be a an area of intense debate in construction circles. There are many advantages and disadvantages to buying a home with vinyl siding or in deciding to install it on your home. Here, we’ll break down the pros and cons of the popular siding material and how to decide if it’s right for your home. Over the years, advancement in the makeup of vinyl and advances in the technology itself has made it a more popular choice among home owners and builders. Vinyl was introduced in the 1950’s as a replacement for aluminum siding. Originally, vinyl was notorious for fading, cracking and buckling. Now, the material has been perfected to a new, higher standard. Advantages To Vinyl Siding:

  • Cedar is 2 1/2 times more expensive than than vinyl
  • Vinyl siding never needs to be painted
  • Easy to install
  • The material is versatile
  • The color will outlast paint
  • Water resistant
  • Helps to prevent damage from rain and snow
The biggest advantage of vinyl siding is the fact that it simply needs to be power washed from time to time and painting is not necessary. While power washing is an expense, it’s still less expensive than painting the entire house every five years. In the right conditions, the siding also usually holds its color for a long, long period of time. However, there are always exceptions to these rules. Cons Of Vinyl Siding:
  • There’s no time frame of how long vinyl siding will last
  • The durability of vinyl siding depends upon how the material itself
  • Vinyl siding is often installed over old siding, so existing problems could still remain
  • It’s flammable, so grills and other items could pose a hazard
  • It may be hard to find a replacement piece in a matching color when you need it
  • The siding could increase your home’s chances of developing mold on the outside
  • Susceptible to cracks
  • Seasonal maintenance is required
The cons listed above are mere warnings of the problems that could arise when vinyl siding is installed. There are pretty strict construction codes surrounding the installation of siding to help prevent these problems, yet, you should keep them in mind. The problems that could arise with siding also depend upon the type of material that’s used to make the siding. It’s good to do some investigating before you fully decide on the best material for your home’s exterior So, while vinyl siding isn’t a foolproof choice for a damage-free home, it does have some significant advantages over wood siding and paint. Depending upon the climate you live in and the type of look that you’re going for on your home, the decision is ultimately up to you.







Tags